So Many Choices…Wish I Had More Time and Space

For the third project, I thought I would be doing a derivative of The Makey Journey. The Makey Journey is a project that appealed to me when we reviewed Maker/Scratch projects during the first week. It combines sprites going through multiple scenes in Scratch while the teams in real life follow a circuit either in a large room or through hallways. The path are wires connected to the Makey Makey and the players need to walk the circuit barefoot.

When I started on the project this week, I realize I had no guarantee that I would have the space to set up an obstacle course. I am looking to be able to set my combined and final project up as an escape room. It is unlikely that at a school or a conference that I would have enough space or even time to be as ambitious as the Makey Journey is. So I adjusted. I thought about what was possible in a small room.

I’ve played the Marshmellow Game with educators over the past five years so I thought a problem solving group game would work. The Escape lets them see how Scratch and Makey Makey can work along with the concept of an Escape Room. I’m still toying with the haunted house and Sherlock Holmes so I combined both. Please consider the theme a work in progress. There may also be McGyver elements present.

Bat shot

I decided to place a pressure pad over the door and see how fast a group of educators could figure out how to reach it. It also meant the standard Makey Makey wires were not enough. So I went to Home Depot and purchased additional wires and alligator clips.

Over Door

Here’s the link to the Scratch Game and below are the conditions.

1) Educators are familiar with Scratch and Makey Makey and are given only 5 minutes.

Given a computer, the Escape game in Scratch, a Makey Makey device hooked up to wire leading up to a pressure plate over the door, educators will use objects in the room to create a circuit that activates the pressure plate.

Computer and Door

Inside the room, there will not be a chair but there will be a number of objects that can reach the pressure plate. Included in object in a junk drawer in the desk with be a roll of aluminum foil. Educators will be given the instruction that they can use anything in the room.

Educators must hypothesis of which objects will close the circuit and test out their hypothesis.

From the Closet

2) Educators are not very familiar with Scratch and Makey Makey and have 20 minutes.

Given a computer, the Escape game in Scratch, a Makey Makey device hooked up to wire leading up to a pressure plate over the door, educators will use objects in the room to create a circuit that activates the pressure plate.

Inside the room, there will not be a chair but there will be a number of objects that can reach the pressure plate. Included in object in a junk drawer in the desk with be a roll of aluminum foil. Educators will be given the instruction that they can use anything in the room.

Notes:

The materials needed were aluminum tape, about 7 ft of 20-2 wire, two alligator Test Clips, and a multipurpose wiring tool (to cut the wire and strip the insulation away as needed). Alternative, based off information from several messaging boards, you can use any wire you want so you do not need to use 20-2 wire. I decided to use it because it was really lightweight and inexpensive ($7.77 for two pieces of wire that were 65 ft long). Another solution would be to make a foil strip that runs the length of the wall, connects to the sensor at one end and has a tab at the other end where you can clip on the MaKey MaKey Test Lead.

So many options at the electronics department in Home Depot!

Home Depot 1

Home Depot 2

Sensor Design and Final Material

Sensor Design

Depending on the size of the room and location of the MaKey MaKey, I could require the players to form a human chain, where one person is holding onto the ground lead and then they rest link hands until the requisite length of the circuit is met.

 

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